Google E-Reader to Take on Kindle

Google e-reader

Big news as Google has teamed up with device manufacturer iriver to release a Google-branded eReader. The iriver Story HD will be the first eReader integrated with the Google eBooks platform. The Wi-Fi enabled device has a 6″ eInk screen and a QWERTY keyboard. It goes on sale this coming Sunday at Target for $139.99, the same price as the Kindle.

Do you think the eReader will be competitive? [READ ON]

Amazon Rumored to Develop a Tablet

Amazon is slated to enter the tablet market with its own Android-based tablet PC as soon as this fall or late summer, reported Digitimes.com. The article reports that Taiwan-based component makers have said the online retail giant is targeting global sales of 4 million units in 2011. 

“Amazon adopts processors developed by… [READ THE FULL STORY]

South Korea Going Book-less by 2015?

Yes, it’s hard to imagine a world without a book case, and the handful of novels we never got around to picking up yet. In South Korea, there seems to be much less fear over a paperless world, as the country has promised to replace all the paper in its schools by 2015.

The peninsular nation plans on spending over $2 billion developing digital text books, which would then be available on students’ school-supplied tablets. Along with more traditional learning content, students will also get… [LEARN MORE – CLICK HERE]

A New Way of Reading [USA Today feature]

Ipad as a reading device

The New Way

Brian Leung, novelist and professor of English at the University of Louisville, said that having your entire library with you wherever you go was pretty extraordinary. “It’s having all your books in your pocket, and having all your magazine subscriptions in your pocket.”

Although Leung has a strong preference for physical books, he has started to think about buying ebook versions of things he’s likely to only read once. He recently read Tina Fey’s memoir, “Bossypants,” and cited it as an example. “It’s something that I wouldn’t go back to,” Leung said.

Like Leung, some readers who would never give up physical books have started to opt for ebook versions of one-time reads. James Bickers, the morning host for WFPK, is one. “It’s largely a clutter thing,” Bickers said. “I don’t let a book into my house if I don’t think I’m going to read it more than once.”  [READ THE USA TODAY STORY]

Discoverability – A Major Key for Authors

Books Are Dead?

Perhaps the more than 200 authors gathered last month at the Hyatt Regency for the Writers’ League of Texas Agents Conference should have prepared themselves upon seeing the title of blogger and publishing strategist Jane Friedman’s keynote lunch speech, “Is the Book Dead? Who Cares!”

As Friedman got under way, she talked about “the state of the book” and then clicked to an image of a mushroom cloud. The room full of would-be authors sat aghast…

From creating a great blog to finding a following on Twitter, Friedman’s point was clear — authors need to create a direct line to their audience, a platform that they control. [READ THE FULL STORY]

Libraries and e-Books

The hottest items at the public library can’t be seen on bookshelves. Kindles, iPads and Nooks are being joined by more e-readers and tablets. And the changing shape of books has the library community pondering the role of the traditional brick-and-mortar buildings where paper and ink have long reigned.

“Everybody got these e-book readers and came to the public libraries and said, ‘I want the e-books,'” said Christine Lind Hage, a Michigan librarian who serves on an e-book task force for the American Library Association. “A good library is … [READ THE FULL STORY]