Read While You Wait e-books

college courseThe online textbook vendor Chegg has launched a new “read while you wait” feature that gives its customers access to an ebook version of some books while the paper versions ship.

“Read while you wait” ebook access costs $1.99 and will be valid for seven days.

The short ebook pass is not available as a standalone product, which means it’s only available as an add-on to the price of a physical book.  LEARN MORE

Duke to offer Thousands of Free e-books

Duke staying with the times

Duke University is about to expand access to free electronic books to include thousands of titles. This fall Duke will be among the nation’s first institutions to offer free online access to books that are still protected by copyright and not in the public domain. Published between 1923 and 1963, the books will be offered to the public because the owners of the copyrights can’t be contacted – either the publishers went out of business or the authors are deceased.

Duke announced the project this week along with other universities – Cornell, Emory and Johns Hopkins. They were able to do what Google hasn’t been able to because their library systems own print editions of the books.

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A Look at the Classroom of the Future

Surprise. Textbooks, notebooks, pencils and pens may soon be obsolete in most classrooms around the country.

Some schools are downloading all of their texts for each student into E – books and in Fairfax County, VA school leaders are opting for online Social Studies textbooks starting next year.

“More futuristically speaking my expectation is… [READ MORE]

Columbia’s Publishing Course Impacted by E-books

college courseThe success of e-books is affecting all aspects of the publishing industry, recently leading to a change in the material discussed at Columbia’s Publishing Course, a annual six-week summer session to educate college graduates on book editing, sales, cover design and publicity. 

This year, the course focused on “The Digital Future” of publishing and the transition to e-books.  The course… [CLICK HERE]

South Korea Going Book-less by 2015?

Yes, it’s hard to imagine a world without a book case, and the handful of novels we never got around to picking up yet. In South Korea, there seems to be much less fear over a paperless world, as the country has promised to replace all the paper in its schools by 2015.

The peninsular nation plans on spending over $2 billion developing digital text books, which would then be available on students’ school-supplied tablets. Along with more traditional learning content, students will also get… [LEARN MORE – CLICK HERE]

Libraries and e-Books

The hottest items at the public library can’t be seen on bookshelves. Kindles, iPads and Nooks are being joined by more e-readers and tablets. And the changing shape of books has the library community pondering the role of the traditional brick-and-mortar buildings where paper and ink have long reigned.

“Everybody got these e-book readers and came to the public libraries and said, ‘I want the e-books,'” said Christine Lind Hage, a Michigan librarian who serves on an e-book task force for the American Library Association. “A good library is … [READ THE FULL STORY]

First Digital-Only Textbook for K-12

McGraw-Hill’s new format, CINCH, is a cloud-based curriculum for K-12 math and 7-12 science. It makes all course materials, which include ebooks, presentations, assessments and animation clips, available from any device with a browser. Students in a class can also participate in Facebook-like conversations that stay with the text. “We’re trying to meet students and teachers where they’re at digitally,” Stansell says.

McGraw-Hill will also be launching a… [READ THE FULL STORY]