All Star Press presents “Quiet Spaces: Hearing God’s Voice in a Noisy World”

Quiet Spaces by James HaleThere are two types of callings: the loud, drama-filled, unmistakable directions that make the good Bible stories, and the quieter, more subtle, personal nudges meant for one person. These latter ones are not intended for public viewing. They are soft, personal, one-to-one messages from God to someone for whom He has a purpose. Maybe for you. 

All Star Press is proud to announce the e-book release of James Hale’s “Quiet Spaces: Hearing God’s Voice in a Noisy World.” This powerful book is available for the Kindle and all e-book formats

Of the two types of callings, the quieter ones are the more common, but less understood. These are ones that Jesus and so many others experienced in biblical times…and today. It’s these quieter callings Hale teaches the reader to hear. These are much more subtle than the dramatic ones. These messages cascade gently down from on high, and we do hear them, but we often do not listen to them. 

The great physicist Albert Einstein understood the goodness of God – like most people do – but he also understood the quietness of so many of God’s greatest works and how we often miss his messages or think he’s being elusive or tricky. Einstein observed that “God is subtle, but He is not malicious.” Yes, God is deep and profound, but not devious. Understanding God often baffles and confuses us, but there is no deception, no false path. God places the cookie jar within our sight, and invites us to stretch to reach it, without any traps in the way. He calls to us in quiet, subtle ways, and none of His callings are evil or misguided. There are no tricks, no deceit, no misdirection. 

In “Quiet Spaces” author James Hale teaches you the simple steps to make your work your calling. This influential book includes an easy-to-use 45-day devotional on career choices that everyone can benefit from.

TESTIMONIALS

“Any young person who reads this book and follows its suggestions is bound to become a better and happier person.” Bethany Holt – Entrepreneur 

“Even though I am past choosing a vocation in life, I still have a road to finish traveling. This book has helped tremendously.” Angela Masters, Retiree 

“God often speaks to us in ‘gentle whispers’ (just ask Elijah). Quiet Spaces will prepare you to hear God’s call to your heart. This is another great resources for Christian workers from a great Christian organization–Path Choices.” James Smith- – Senior Minister, Mt Carmel Chirstian Church, Cynthiana, KY

Are you ready to incorporate your calling into your daily work? Download “Quiet Spaces” today to your Kindle, Nook, iPad or other eReader.

The Dynamic Publishing Industry

September 2011

What the publishing industry faces right now is a customer base that demands a digital product even as the technology that makes these products possible is still in its early stages of development. Random House has experienced a 200 percent growth in eBook sales this year, and every other company’s sales tell similar tales. The various devices on the market—the Kindle, the Nook, and the Kobo eReader, among others—all do different things. Thanks to each business’s attempt to dominate the market, they are mostly incompatible with each other. For example, the Nook and Apple’s iPad feature color displays for picture books, but for the time being the Kindle does not.

How can…READ MORE

Barnes & Noble losing less money

NEW YORK (AP) — Barnes & Noble Inc. said it narrowed its net loss in its fiscal first quarter as sales of its Nook e-book reader and e-books helped offset lower physical book sales.

The company also sounded a positive note about the holidays, saying that traffic will benefit from the fact that its chief rival, Borders Group, will be shuttered by then. Barnes & Noble shares rose nearly 15 percent, or $1.70, to close at $13.13.

“Investors are just feeling assured that Barnes & Noble isn’t following Borders’ downward spiral and the money they’re spending on the Nook … it’s paying off,” said Simba Information senior trade analyst Michael Norris.

Traditional booksellers like Barnes & Noble are facing tough competition from online retailers and discount stores. But the company has invested heavily in its e-book reader to combat this, a strategy that seems to be gaining traction.

“In fiscal 2012, we expect to see leverage as our digital sales growth is projected to exceed the growth of investment spend,” said CEO William Lynch.

Barnes & Noble, which received a $204 million investment from former suitor Liberty Media in August, said its Nook business, including Nooks themselves, e-books and magazines and other digital content and accessories, rose 140 percent to $227 million during the quarter.

The largest U.S. traditional book retailer says its net loss was $56.6 million, or 99 cents per share. That compares with a loss of $62.5 million, or $1.12 per share, last year. Analysts expected a loss of 94 cents per share.

Revenue rose nearly 2 percent to $1.42 billion from $1.4 billion. Analysts expected $1.46 billion in revenue.

Revenue in stores open at least one year __ a key indicator of a retailer’s health __ fell 1.6 percent at regular stores and 1.8 percent at college bookstores. But revenue from the web site rose 37 percent, driven by sales of Barnes & Noble’s Nook Color and Nook Simple Touch Reader, as well as digital content.

Barnes & Noble says it expects to get a lift in sales of $150 million to $200 million after former rival Borders, which declared bankruptcy in February and said it would liquidate in July, completes liquidation sales and ends operations.

“We’re convinced this holiday will be the biggest traffic we’ve had in the stores over five years,” Lynch said in a call with analysts.

In fiscal 2012, the company expects a net loss of 10 cents to 50 cents per share on revenue of $7.4 billion. Analysts expect a net loss of 16 cents per share on revenue of $7.43 billion.

The New York company expects revenue from its Nook business to double in 2012, to $1.8 billion from $880 million.

NY Times Writer analyzes various e-readers

Which ereader is best?

Which ereader is best?

Here is the critical question for us avid readers: Which e-reader or tablet is the best for reading books?

“So I set out to try them all, reading a chapter on each: the Amazon Kindle, the first- and second-generation Apple iPads, the Barnes & Noble Nook, an iPhone, a Windows Phone, a Google Android phone, a Google Android tablet and a laptop computer. To be fair, I also read a chapter in that old-fashioned form — a crumply old print paperback.”

READ THE ANALYSIS

Are eReaders taking over?

Libraries and ebooksOn a recent Go bus trip from Hamilton to Toronto, more than half the approximately 50 passengers had their noses buried in something.

Two of them were reading books. A handful of people were busy texting or using an app on their smartphones. One young kid, who looked to be about seven, played a video game and at least eight people seemed to be just staring at their electronic devices.

They were… [READ THIS COMMENTARY]

E-books Gaining in Popularity with Book Clubs

people readingA 2011 survey found the  majority of book club members still prefer the printed book, 25.5 percent reported using an e-reader in 2010, compared to 15.6 percent in 2009. The Amazon Kindle leads the way among e-reading book club members, with 59 percent owning Kindles. The Nook ranked second at 29 percent. Almost 20 percent read e-books on tablets such as the iPad.

An interesting fact noted by… [GET THE STATS HERE]

Online Bestseller Lists Key for Authors

Online Bestseller?How much do e-books benefit when they hit the Nook and Kindle bestseller lists? A lot, new findings suggest. Meanwhile, the New York Times bestseller list appears to have less effect on e-book sales.

“We found that there is a significant benefit to making these lists, and that benefit is far stronger for e-books than it is for print, where titles rise and fall in sales rank far more frequently,” he writes. “In fact, e-books that rise high on the bestseller list can normally look forward to a far longer time on the list than an equivalent print book.”  [LEARN MORE]

A New Way of Reading [USA Today feature]

Ipad as a reading device

The New Way

Brian Leung, novelist and professor of English at the University of Louisville, said that having your entire library with you wherever you go was pretty extraordinary. “It’s having all your books in your pocket, and having all your magazine subscriptions in your pocket.”

Although Leung has a strong preference for physical books, he has started to think about buying ebook versions of things he’s likely to only read once. He recently read Tina Fey’s memoir, “Bossypants,” and cited it as an example. “It’s something that I wouldn’t go back to,” Leung said.

Like Leung, some readers who would never give up physical books have started to opt for ebook versions of one-time reads. James Bickers, the morning host for WFPK, is one. “It’s largely a clutter thing,” Bickers said. “I don’t let a book into my house if I don’t think I’m going to read it more than once.”  [READ THE USA TODAY STORY]

Libraries and e-Books

The hottest items at the public library can’t be seen on bookshelves. Kindles, iPads and Nooks are being joined by more e-readers and tablets. And the changing shape of books has the library community pondering the role of the traditional brick-and-mortar buildings where paper and ink have long reigned.

“Everybody got these e-book readers and came to the public libraries and said, ‘I want the e-books,'” said Christine Lind Hage, a Michigan librarian who serves on an e-book task force for the American Library Association. “A good library is … [READ THE FULL STORY]

E-Reader Adoption Crushing Tablets

E-reader ownership among U.S. adults has surged in the last six months, doubling from 6% to 12%, according to a survey released today by the Pew Research Center. That remarkable rate of adoption surpasses even tablets, which are owned by just 8% of adults 18 and older.

That’s great news for Amazon and Barnes & Noble, whose e-readers, the Kindle and Nook, are flying off shelves (e-shelves, rather). But it might also come as a surprise to consumers inundated with ads for the iPad, Samsung Galaxy Tab, and Motorola Xoom that e-readers are outpacing tablets. [read the full story]