Imposter Nurse – The Beginning

Imposter Nurse a true storyAfter Angie, her husband, and their 4 children were settled into their new home in the quiet little New England town in the summer of 1973, she started missing the job she had left at their former location many miles away. She had been so occupied with selling a home, buying a home, moving, settling the older children in new schools, finding new doctors and dentists, and learning her way around the new territory that she hadn’t thought much about looking for a job.  But once they were into a routine, with the oldest children in school, and the youngest with playmates right next door, she realized that she missed interacting with the patients she had cared for when she as a nursing assistant on the evening shift at a hospital near their prior home.

She had many wonderful experiences there, working with very professional and caring nurses and aides. Some of the patients she met during that time made a lasting impression on her. As much as Angie enjoyed the time she spent with her children, she also liked being able to interact with other adults.  She wasn’t one who liked to join clubs but working part-time in a field where she felt she belonged, while supplementing the family income, made her feel like she was making a contribution. The time had arrived for her to start reading the want-ads in the local paper. She knew that working the 3 PM to 11 PM shift at a hospital would not make sense, as she no longer had reliable the help that her parents had provided to take care of the children until her husband got home from work in the evening.  But she thought that it might be possible to find a position in a nursing home where the hours she could comfortably work would be acceptable.  Although the Main Street Nursing Home was looking for part-time help on the 3 PM to 11 PM shift, she decided to ask if management there might consider hiring her from 6 PM to 11 PM.  She had worked in nursing homes previously, and she knew that was when the residents needed the most help. If she could work those hours, she wouldn’t have to leave home until after her husband had returned from work and the family had dinner together.  When she called to ask for an interview, she decided not to mention the hours she would prefer. That would come later.

The Main Street Nursing Home was located in the center of the small town. Angie remembered seeing it when she and the children had visited the Town Library shortly after they arrived there.  It was a lovely old New England home, white with black shutters and set way back from the road with an oval driveway in front, and large trees surrounding it. The wrap-around porch gave the large home a stately look. When Angie drove up for her interview, she noticed that there was an addition to the side of the home that was not easily seen from the street due to the many trees and hedges in front.

After she parked the car and opened the door, stepped out and saw a dime on the ground. She picked up the dime, smiled and held it thinking that she probably was meant to be there. She said, “In God We Trust,” to herself as she remembered her former patient, Bill. He was a young man who had returned from war with stomach trouble that he thought was a result of the poor diet he had eaten during the time he was deployed. However, when the problems persisted, he learned that his stomach trouble was really caused by cancer.  By the time the cancer was discovered, there is very little that could be done for him, but he was willing to try the various chemotherapy drugs recommended by the doctors who were treating him, even though they all made him extremely sick.  The way in which the young man accepted his fate, with tremendous faith in God, was something Angie had rarely witnessed in those she had cared for.

When Bill was first admitted, it was expected that he would die within weeks. However, to the surprise of everyone, he survived for many more months.  In all of that time, his demeanor never changed.   He was most grateful for anything that anyone did for him, always using the words please and thank you.  Angie was not the only one who thought Bill was a very special young man.  All of the others working on that floor were quick to respond when his call light went on.  The nurses who were responsible for giving him his pain medication tried to get to his room before he had to ask for it because they were all aware that he didn’t like to ask. If the usual nurses were not available and a different nurse was on the floor, the others were quick to let her know when his pain medication was due.

When an older man across the hall from Bill noticed that the nurses seemed to spend extra time in his room, he complained to Angie one day about the younger guy getting so much attention.  He wondered what the heck was so special about him.  At first, Angie didn’t know how to respond.  It really wasn’t right to talk to one patient about another, but it appeared to her that the older man was jealous of the attention that Bill was getting, and she wanted to let him know that he need not be.  She reasoned that if they had both been patients in a semi-private room, they would know just about everything about each other’s condition, so she took a deep breath and walked to the door and closed it before turning toward the man to tell him about Bill’s situation.

“I really shouldn’t be talking about other patients,” she started, “but since you asked, I guess I should tell you.  When he first came in, he had a lot of company.  He was a basketball player in a local high school before he joined the Army and went to Vietnam, so a lot of people know him.  I don’t know if people got tired of visiting or if they just didn’t like seeing him getting so sick, but most of them have stopped visiting.  Seems like only his parents and sister visit now.  I guess that is one of the reasons that we feel like we should spend more time with him. He is only 23 years old, and he’s going to die soon.  He has tried everything the doctors have offered, but we just don’t know yet how to cure stomach cancer.  I’m not sure that any of us feel sorry for him as much as we are kind of in awe of him, because he really never complains.”

“Oh! My God! I had no idea!” the older man exclaimed, and thoughtfully followed with, “I’m glad you told me.  I think I needed to know that.”  For the remainder of the time that he was a patient, he asked what kind of a day Bill was having. Angie thought that breaking protocol was perhaps not a bad idea at times.  But she didn’t tell the other patient about the condition of Bill’s body after he lost so much weight that there was little flesh on his bones.  She didn’t think she could adequately portray how much his body had been ravaged or how much pain he endured, anyway.  The nurses worked constantly to keep bedsores under control by changing his positions frequently and putting fresh dressings on his wounds, and they all admitted to each other that his condition broke their hearts.

Instead of going to the break room when she had time for a break, Angie chose to visit with Bill, with the hope that some of his acceptance of the Lord’s will would rub off on her.  Sometimes she simply sat with him while he watched something on television or dozed off for a few minutes.  He thanked her for doing so.  One evening when he requested a cola drink, Angie discovered that there wasn’t any in the refrigerator on their floor, so she went to the break room and bought one for him from the machine.  When she brought it to him, he noticed that it was in the type of cup that comes out of a vending machine, rather than the usual hospital cups.  He asked her if she had bought it, and she acknowledged that she had done so because there wasn’t any available in their refrigerator.  He told her that wasn’t right, and he should pay for it.  She said that was nonsense.  They went back and forth for a few minutes when he declared that she had to at least take a dime out of his drawer, because his mother always told his sister that a girl should always have a dime on her, in case she needed to make a phone call.  Angie thought that was the sweetest reason to accept a dime. She thanked him and put it in her pocket, thinking that it was the kind of gift she would always treasure.

Bill died shortly after that.  She felt that she was most privileged to have been one of the last people to be with him before he drew his last breath.  It was a profound loss to everyone who cared for him. For many days there were no new patients in his room, which seemed to make his absence even more profound.  Angie believed that he was with the Lord, but she felt that she would be comforted if she would receive some kind of sign of confirmation, so she prayed that one would be given to her.  A short time later, she was on her way into the hospital with another nurse one day when she spotted a dime on the steps.  She stopped abruptly declaring, “That’s mine.”   As she bent to pick it up her thoughts were of Bill, and she smiled.  She looked at the words, “IN GOD WE TRUST” on the dime, and she smiled again.  It seemed like a sign… a reminder that although there were many things she didn’t understand, she knew that God was in charge, and she needed to trust.  The other nurse remarked that she never saw anyone so happy to find a dime. Angie felt that was her own personal connection, so she didn’t have any desire to explain her reaction.

As time went by, she noticed that she often found a dime here, and a dime there. Perhaps she had found money in the past, but she couldn’t remember ever finding dimes so easily. After a while, she didn’t find them as frequently, but it seemed that every time she was feeling troubled by something, or had a difficult decision to make, a dime would land in her path.  She would think that a girl should always have a dime on her, and that she needed to keep trusting in God.  Of all the patients she had cared for when she worked there and at other hospitals, Bill was by far the most spiritual one she had ever encountered.

With the newfound dime in her pocket, she approached the nursing home believing that she would get the job if God wanted her to.

Read the rest of Denise Crompton’s Imposter Nurse today via Kindle

“Angel Gabriel – A True Story” Translated into Portuguese

IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Tarpon Springs, FL, October 31, 2013 — Angel Gabriel, the true story in the aftermath of Comair crash 3272, was penned by Michigan resident Joy LaPlante and released in e-book format earlier this summer.  The amazing story, which recounts LaPlante’s experiences following that aviation crash, has now been translated into Portuguese.

LaPlante was approached by a reader of her book who was so taken by the story that she offered to translate the work into her native language.

Angel Gabriel, a true story by author Joy LaPlante“I sent an email to Joy saying that I was willing to translate her story into the Portuguese language free of charge,” explained translator Isabel L. Soares.  “I did this because I knew in my heart that she was genuine, that she was not doing this for the money and because her main reason to write this story was to bring hope, joy and peace to people’s hearts.”

“I do not follow any religion, but so what?” continued Soares. “I believe there is only one God, the God that was willing to once again answer my prayers and to help me bring healing to all those whose life I touch daily.”

The true story of Angel Gabriel (or Anjo Gabriel in Portuguese) begins on January 9, 1997.  LaPlante’s book tells about the events following the only major, commercial airline crash in the United States in 1997. Originally written and self-published in 1999 by author Joy LaPlante, “Angel Gabriel – A True Story” was picked up by publishing house All Star Press, updated, and re-released in all e-book formats.

“When I wrote the book, I just sat down and wrote it,” explained Joy.  “I just told the story of my experience with the Angel Gabriel.  I never thought in a million years I would write a book and become a published author.  It is just something that happened.  I am just a simple woman who told my story, in my own words, to help spread the message.”

The Portuguese edition of “Angel Gabriel – A True Story” is titled “Anjo Gabriel – Uma Historia Real” and is available only through the Kindle store from leading retailer Amazon.com. The book includes the English version as a bonus and is offered at the introductory price of only $3.47.

About All Star Press publishing house

All Star Press is a print and digital publishing firm based out of Tarpon Springs, Florida with a specialization in e-books.  Founded in 2011, All Star Press is the publisher of 12 books, including “Sleep Great for Life,” “The Road to Recovery” and “Getting Seen.” The firm publishes in both print and e-book formats. Learn more at www.allstarpress.com.

 

A True Story Following the Crash of Flight 3272

“Angel Gabriel” Now Available in e-book

It was January 9, 1997. Outside of her home in Monroe, Michigan, it was cold, windy and snowing. Inside, Joy LaPlante was counting her blessings for a warm house and thinking how glad she was that she didn’t have to go outside.  Joy was startled by the sound of her phone ringing. It was her good friend Honey.

“Joy, did you hear what happened?” “No. What?” she answered.

Angel Gabriel, a true story by author Joy LaPlante“I turned on my police scanner,” Honey continued, her voice serious. “Joy, there has been a plane crash!”

Joy felt her heart sink as Honey continued, “They’re saying it’s in a field in Ida.”

What follows is the true story in the aftermath of Comair crash 3272, the only major, commercial airline crash in the United States in 1997 and the first incident following the crash of TWA 800. Originally written and self-published in 1999 by author Joy LaPlante, “Angel Gabriel – A True Story” has been updated and re-released in all e-book formats by publishing house All Star Press.

“When I wrote the book, I just sat down and wrote it,” explained Joy.  “I just told the story of my experience with the Angel Gabriel.  I never thought in a million years I would write a book and become a published author.  It is just something that happened.  I am just a simple woman who told my story, in my own words, to help spread the message.”

Offered at the introductory price of only $2.97, “Angel Gabriel – A True Story” is now available in all e-book formats from leading retailers Amazon.com, Barnes & Noble, Smashwords and direct from the publisher at AllStarPress.com.

Buy Now Only $2.97 in PDF format direct from the publisher.

Book reviewers and bloggers should contact the publisher at allstarpress@verizon.net to request a copy.

About All Star Press

All Star Press is a print and digital publishing firm based out of Tarpon Springs, Florida with a specialization in e-books.  Founded in 2011, All Star Press is the publisher of 10 books, including “Sleep Great for Life,” “The Road to Recovery” and “Getting Seen.” The firm publishes in both print and e-book formats. Learn more at www.allstarpress.com.

“Angel Gabriel – A True Story” Released in E-Book Formats

Angel Gabriel the bookIt was the beginning of the New Year, 1997. Outside of her home in Monroe, Michigan, it was cold, windy and snowing. Inside, Joy LaPlante was counting her blessings for a warm house and thinking how glad she was that she didn’t have to go outside.  Joy was startled by the sound of my phone ringing. It was her good friend Honey.

 “Joy, did you hear what happened?” “No. What?” she answered.

“I turned on my police scanner,” Honey continued, her voice serious. “Joy, there has been a plane crash!”

Joy felt her heart sink as Honey continued.  “They’re saying it’s in a field in Ida.”

They listened to what was being said on the scanner and could hear a fireman’s voice quivering as he spoke.  “We don’t know what kind of plane this is, but it looks like a disaster.”

The fireman spoke again, “Call in Petersburg, Deerfield and Monroe. Put everybody else on standby, we’re going to need help. We need to find out what type of plane this was, and how many were on.”

Two weeks later on the night of January 23, Joy felt the presence of someone standing over her, watching her.  She was afraid to open her eyes for fear of what she would see.  Joy just knew if she opened her eyes there would be someone standing there looking at her.  She laid there thinking, maybe it was the spirit of her grandmother or grandfather, but somehow she knew it wasn’t.  She started saying The Lord’s Prayer and then started praying that whatever was there would go away.

However, just then, with her eyes closed, Joy saw the most beautiful face she had ever seen. His eyes were as blue as the sky on a day full of sunshine with no clouds.  The blue part of his eyes had purple running through it and gold flecks that sparkled.  At first, she just stared at his eyes in total awe.

Then she realized her eyes were open, and the feeling of love was overwhelming.  So overwhelming in fact, that Joy thought her chest and heart were going to explode.  She was no longer scared.  She looked at him and said “Hello.”

This is true story in the aftermath of ComAir crash 3272, the only major, commercial airline crash in the United States in 1997. Originally written and self-published in 1999 by author Joy LaPlante, “Angel Gabriel – A True Story” has been updated to be re-released in all e-book formats by publishing house All Star Press. The release date was Monday, June 24, 2013.

Book reviewers and bloggers should contact the publisher at allstarpress@verizon.net to request a copy for review.

Goodnight, Boone children’s book now available in e-book format

The All Star Press children’s book “Goodnight, Boone” is now available in e-book format (PDF) for the first time. Only $5.97, this wonderful book about the Blue Ridge Mtn. town of Boone, North Carolina can be downloaded instantly to share with your children.
Buy Now

This is believed to be the first ever children’s book about Boone, North Carolina, the picturesque town in the Blue Ridge Mountains. Home to Appalachian State University, Boone is a popular tourist destination and ski haven.

Author Yogi Collins grew up in Boone and while she loves that the High Country is filled with interesting and quirky people, she is also fascinated by how people end up in this little slice of heaven. A television producer and writer by trade, Collins lives in Boone with her husband Dan and two incredible kids. This is her first book.

“I started working on this project several years ago,” explained Collins. “It’s been a dream of mine to produce children’s books and the idea of doing one about my home town was the perfect place to start.”

Published last fall, “Goodnight, Boone” is also available in print from the publisher All Star Press or on major retail sites such as  BN.com and Amazon.com, where it is rated 100% five stars.

Goodnight Boone by Yogi CollinsAbout Boone, North Carolina

Boone acquired its name from the famous pioneer and explorer Daniel Boone, who is believed to have camped at a site within the present city limits on several occasions.

Incorporated in 1872, Boone has the highest elevation (3,300 feet) of any town of its size (over 10,000 population) east of the Mississippi River.

Located off the beautiful Blue Ridge Parkway, Boone offers visitors a four-season playground for sports and outdoor activities. Boone is recognized by travel journalists as an “ultimate outdoor adventure destination” in the Southeast. It is also home to the Appalachian Regional Medical Center, scores of large and small businesses, as well as numerous nearby tourist attractions such as Grandfather Mountain which is prominently featured in “Goodnight, Boone.”

Another FREE Kindle book this week from All Star Press

Spanish Grief recovery bookTake advantage of the Spanish edition of “The Road to Recovery: Overcoming and Moving Beyond Your Grief” in the Amazon Kindle Store now through the end of day, Saturday, June 30th.

Written for anyone who is grieving the loss of a loved one, “The Road to Recovery” gives life-changing advice to help sufferers move on and pick up their lives.

“El Camino a la Recuperacion” by Rich Nilsen is FREE through Amazon. There is no Kindle eReader required as the Amazon Cloud service allows members to read books online.

 

Some Publishers Abandoning Amazon

People in general don’t like monopolies, and why should they?  Monopoly – the term not the board game – is a bad word. Amazon.com is pretty darn close to a monopoly in the ebook world, and the behemoth has taken quite a few steps towards alienating publishers, including dictating prices and various other strong-arm tactics.

Writer John Oakes of Publishers Weekly recently penned a piece on this topic, profiling a smaller publisher that is focusing on direct sales to the consumer. Oakes writes…

Despite a computer on every desk and exciting new marketing tools online, we perpetuate the same old system, working through retailers and treating the electronic world as simply a tool to augment our presence in the real world. And it means wrestling with Amazon over how to sell.

Although we are certainly not abandoning the Amazon e-book platform, All Star Press is like many publishers in that we are also offering our books for sale right here on our website. There is no reason publishers can’t do both. Our view is that the All Star Press books should be available to everyone and anyone.

Check out our current inventory of e-books from All Star Press:

Quiet Spaces: Hearing God’s Call in a Noisy World

The House that Richard Built

Sleep Great for Life

The Road to Recovery: Overcoming and Moving Beyond Your Grief

 

School Libraries adding more e-books

School libraries ebooksThe number of school libraries building electronic stacks is increasing in the past few years.

A 2011 survey by the School Library Journal found that 31 percent had e-books in their collections. But 63 percent of those surveyed said they couldn’t afford to buy digital books.

On a recent afternoon, 9-year-old Josh Hezel and his classmates were in the library at Long Elementary.

A generation ago, Hezel and the others might have stopped by a shelf of recommended books, or searched on his own in the card catalog. Instead, he and his classmates sat down with some of the school’s new e-readers. The book titles flew by on a digital screen as the boy scrolled through, stopping at one that caught his eye.

“I think librarians are in favor of anything that gets students reading,” said Margaret Sullivan, regional director for the Missouri Association of School Libraries and president of St. Louis Suburban School Librarians Association. “What we just want to make sure is that every student has access to technology, because some students might not have that at home.”

Read more about the Library ebook movement

Publishing Push coming from Apple

Apple

Apple could be hosting a special media event in New York City this month. The event won’t be about Apple’s next iPad if reports are believed to be correct. Instead, Apple will be talking directly to the publishing industry.

The theme of the event will be publishing and e-books. Considering reports indicate Eddy Cue will be prominently involved, it’s a focus area that makes a lot of sense.

Apple SVP of Internet Software and Services, Mr. Cue is in charge of the iBookstore, as well as the iTunes and App Stores, iAd and iCloud. Cue is the one who took the stage the last time the company had a publishing event, when it unveiled News Corp.’s publication The Daily.

READ THE FULL STORY



More Authors Opting to Self Publish

Ipad as a reading device

The New Way

This spring, best-selling thriller writer and former CIA agent Barry Eisler wrote a piece in the New York Times about why he turned down a half-million dollar advance from St. Martin’s Press to self-publish instead: He believes he can market his books better on his own.

Neal Pollack, author of several books, including “Stretch: The Unlikely Making of a Yoga Dude,” wrote in another New York Times piece called “The Case for Self-Publishing” that “self-publication crackles with possibility as never before” and vowed to bring out his next book himself, as an experiment. He writes… READ MORE